Reach Out to the Old Fashioned Ways of Communication

I was sitting here the other night and thought to myself how almost every one of us is hooked on the digital media and online world: emails and texts and chats, facebook, etc.

Nevertheless, wouldn’t it be nice to receive sometimes a card or letter in the mail? What about just picking up the phone and talk to a person, instead of spending a lot of time writing an email, texting or typing an online message?

Occasionally, I still like to practice the old fashioned ways of communication: I like to pick up the phone and talk to people. In my opinion, talking on the phone minimizes a lot of miss-communication, and eliminates the time to think: “How am I going to say this in a message, so they understand where I am coming from?”. Sounds familiar? Well, let me share a couple of thoughts with you: one of my goals is to pick up the phone more often during the week and talk to a client or friend to congratulate them, or share good news or to just check in. And what about writing a card to a client or friend saying thanks or congratulate them? I believe that it is much more

Well, let me share a couple of thoughts with you:
– One of my goals is to pick up the phone more often during the week and talk to a client or friend to congratulate them, or share good news or to just check in.
– I implemented a once a month teleseminar where clients and prospects can call in and ask questions about online marketing.
– And what about writing a card to a client, prospect or friend saying thanks or congratulate them? I am making it a goal to write at least 1-2 cards a month to my contacts. I mostly use SendOutCards or sometimes I just hand-write a card and send it that way.

I believe that a card or hearing your voice is much more personal than receiving an email, text or an online message; what do you think?
I know we are all busy, but I just want to keep the old fashioned ways of communication alive and minimize the digital habits.
Let me know your opinion.

Photo credit: StockSnap.io by Aaron Burden

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